3 Ways to Do Scissor Jumps

3 Ways to Do Scissor Jumps

3 Ways to Do Scissor Jumps – wikiHow Fitness

Scissor jumps are a whole-body exercise that also give you a good cardiovascular workout. They may also be known as scissor hops or runs. This exercise typically is associated with interval training.
Scissor jumps are a whole-body exercise that also give you a good cardiovascular workout. They may also be known as scissor hops or runs. This exercise typically is associated with interval training. While you probably shouldn’t do high-intensity intervals more than once or twice a week, working out briefly at moderate intensity is safe to do three or four times a week. Just make sure you check in with your healthcare provider first, especially if you’re recovering from a recent injury or have a chronic health condition. [1] 1Start standing on a mat. To get ready to do scissor jumps, make sure you’ve spent a few minutes warming up, then stand at the end of an exercise mat with your arms by your sides and your feet about hip-width apart. [2] Hop your right leg forward. To get a handle on this exercise, it’s a good idea to practice your leg movements first, then work the arm movements in to complete the exercise. You’re going to hop one leg towards the far end of the mat, then reverse that movement and hop the other leg forward. [3] You’re not really moving forward with this exercise, you’re moving your legs back and forth to imitate scissors. Try to keep your legs straight and extended, without bending your knees, so they look like the blades of a pair of scissors. 3When you are learning make your hops shorter. Maybe just a foot apart at first, then gradually increase the distance between your feet as you improve your balance. Smaller hops can also help to prevent injuries if this is a concern. It is important to build up your strength and balance before doing a move like this that can be hard on the knees. Incorporate arm movement with leg movement. Once you’ve got your legs going correctly, add your arms to the mix. When you hop your right leg forward, swing your right arm backwards. [5] Your legs and arms should be doing opposite motions, so as your left arm goes forward your right arm goes back, at the same time, your right leg goes forward (with your left arm) as your left leg (with your right arm) goes back. 5Maintain continuous motion. Set a timer for 30 or 60 seconds and do as many scissor jumps back and forth as you can during that time. Keep moving for the entire length of the interval. [6] Warm up with static lunges. Static lunges are an effective warm-up to do immediately before you do scissor jumps, especially if you’ve been doing other exercises that primarily target your upper body or core. [7] To do a static lunge, stand at the end of an exercise mat with your feet about hip-width apart. Step your left leg forward and your right leg backward, bending your knees. Your left knee should be at a 90-degree angle, your shin perpendicular to the floor. Your right knee should be bent toward the floor, but not quite touching the floor. Hold the lunge for a second or two, then return your feet to the standing position and repeat on the opposite side. Do these for about a minute, using slow, controlled movements. Work your core with snowboarder crunches. Snowboarder crunches are simple to pick up, but also can be a really challenging exercise to build strength in your abdominal area. Lie on your back with your knees bent at 90 degrees and your feet off the ground. Begin crunches, twisting your upper body and your hips towards each other. Alternate sides, twisting first to the left and then to the right. Build strength in your glutes and legs. Squats and squat kickbacks are great exercises to include in an interval workout if you want to focus on lower body strength. You can do squats as a static exercise for a longer intervals, and squat kickbacks as a higher intensity exercise. For squat kickbacks, go down into a regular squat with your feet about shoulder-width apart. As you come up from the squat, kick one leg back behind you, keeping your knee straight. Go back down into a squat, kicking back the other leg when you come up. Do as many of these as you can in a 30-second interval, using controlled movements and keeping your core stable. Get a whole-body workout with Burpees. Burpees are a grueling body-weight exercise that often come standard in any interval training routine. While the movement is fairly easy, you probably will find you get tired pretty quickly. [8] Set a timer for 20 or 30 seconds and stand with your feet about shoulder-width apart, maybe a little wider. Squat, reaching your hands to the floor in front of your feet. Then kick your legs back into a plank. Lower your chest to the floor, or as far as you can go, then push back up into a plank and jump your feet back up into a squat. You can jump up from the squat and land in a squatting position at the end of the exercise if you want to increase the intensity. Use mountain climbers to strengthen your legs and core. Mountain climbers are another standard exercise frequently featured in interval training. This exercise works your legs as well as your lower abdominal muscles. [9] Get into high plank position with your wrists under your shoulders. Lift your left foot and bend your left knee as you crunch your leg forward. Think of it as trying to get your left knee to touch your left elbow. As you bring your left leg back to plank, bring your right knee forward using the same movement. Set a timer for 30 seconds and do as many of these as you can with continuous movement during that time. Include barbell complexes for strength training. Barbell complexes combine strength-training with interval training to build muscles and encourage fat burning. Keep in mind that these movements are not meant to be done as quickly as possible, like some other interval exercises are. [10] To build strength, start by using just the bar and work your way up in 5-pound increments. You may want to work with a trainer to build complete complexes that effectively target the upper and lower body. However, keep in mind that typically barbell complexes are intended to be more of a whole-body workout. For example, a whole-body barbell complex might include a barbell squat, push press, Romanian deadlift, barbell row, and power clean. Move from each exercise after completing one set of five to eight reps. Include an effective warm-up. If you’re going to do interval training of any intensity, warming up your muscles and your cardiovascular system is essential if you want to avoid cramps or other injuries. [11] For brief interval training, five to ten minutes is enough time to warm up. Good warm-ups include a brief jog or jumping rope. You also can jog in place or just do jumping jacks for a few minutes. Do some dynamic stretching. Dynamic stretching will warm up your body effectively while also stretching all muscle groups so that your whole body is ready for intervals. Follow up your five-minute warm-up with five minutes of dynamic stretching. To organize your dynamic stretching routine, think of going from your head down to your feet. Start by doing head circles, then move down to shoulder circles, then arm circles, and so on. Do leg circles while standing, being sure to do them with your knees bent as well as straight. You can also do these while lying on your back if you are having problems with balance. Alternate aerobic and anaerobic activities. Aerobic exercises are those that engage your cardiovascular system. Anaerobic activities are those in which you remain relatively stationary, such as lifting weights. [12] Make a list of the exercises you want to include in your routine, and label them as aerobic or anaerobic. Then, set up your routine so that you are doing an aerobic exercise followed by an anaerobic exercise followed by another aerobic exercise. For example, you might start with scissor jumps, then do weight lifting or static stretches, then do burpees. Set periods of high intensity and low intensity. Especially if weight loss is one of your exercise goals, alternating high intensity and low intensity can increase your metabolism and get your body to burn excess fat, even after you’ve finished your workout for the day. [13] Your low-intensity periods should be longer than your high-intensity periods. For example, if you’re doing low-intensity exercise for one-minute intervals, you should follow up with a high-intensity exercise for 30 seconds. Avoid working the same muscle groups back-to-back. Since interval training typically does not include rest periods between exercise intervals, working alternate muscle groups allows the muscles you just worked to recover. [14] This can be difficult if you have a lot of whole-body exercises in your routine, but think about what muscles are most targeted by the exercise. For example, if you’re doing planks, this is a whole-body exercise that primarily targets the core. Mountain climbers also target the core, so you wouldn’t want to follow up a plank interval with an interval of mountain climbers. Include a variety of exercises with different goals. To build an effective interval routine yourself, you need to think of what you want to accomplish through your workouts and then look for exercises that will help you achieve those goals. Scissor jumps are an effective whole-body exercise that will help increase your overall fitness, including your cardiovascular fitness. If your goal is simply to become more physically fit, you should incorporate scissor jumps into your routine. If you want to lose weight around your midsection and build strong abdominal muscles, you want to include core exercises such as planks and mountain climbers as well. If you’re new to exercise, work with a personal trainer to build your routine, or search online for free instructional videos of interval routines. Limit your high-intensity sessions. If you’ve decided to start doing high-intensity interval training, you need to be aware of the toll it takes on your body. Although this is a quick and efficient way to improve your fitness, you must allow enough time for your body to recover. [15] Typically you don’t want (or need) to do more than one or two high-intensity interval sessions each week. Alphonso White is a Certified Personal Trainer and Fitness Coach at CompleteBody in New York City. With over 20 years of experience in the personal fitness industry, Alphonso specializes in fat loss, toning, and functional training. As an ACE Certified Personal Trainer (ACE-CPT), he creates structured, personal workout plans geared towards short and long-term fitness goals. Alphonso also holds a BS in Nutrition and Exercise Science from Queens College and is a Black Belt in Seido Karate. Stand with one foot forward and the other back in a lunge position. Jump straight up, switching the position of your feet while you’re in the air. Land quietly with bent knees, then immediately jump again, switching your feet in the air. Repeat for 30 seconds.

X-Scissor (move) – Bulbapedia, the community-driven Pokémon encyclopedia

Jump to navigationJump to search. X- Scissor (Japanese: Scissor Cross) is a damage-dealing Bug-type move introduced in Generation IV.
X-Scissor (Japanese: シザークロス Scissor Cross) is a damage-dealing Bug-type move introduced in Generation IV. It was TM81 from Generation IV to Generation VII, except in Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu! and Let’s Go, Eevee!, where it was TM24. It is TR60 in Generation VIII. X-Scissor’s PP has been reduced to 10, and it has been given an increased chance at landing a critical hit. The user strikes at the target by crossing its scythes or claws as if they were a pair of scissors. This move has a heightened chance of landing a critical hit. Bold indicates a Pokémon gains STAB from this move. Italics indicates a Pokémon whose evolution or alternate form receives STAB from this move. In Explorers of Time and Darkness and Sky, X-Scissor is a move with 40 base power, 10PP and 88% accuracy. The user targets enemy in front. Grid assumes the user is in the square marked by > facing to the right. Orange squares indicate spaces that are hit. Red squares indicate the knockback on hit Pokémon. A blue square indicates the user’s position after performing the move. In Pokémon UNITE, X-Scissor is Crustle’s second move. It is obtained by reaching level 6 and upgrading Fury Cutter into it instead of Stealth Rock. The user attacks three times with his claws, dealing increased damage with each hit and knocking back enemies with each hit. Stuns for 2s if the enemy is against a wall when the third hit lands. X-Scissor can critically hit, however, the user’s base critical hit chance is 0%. At level 13, move’s cooldown is reduced. Kricketune slashes the opponent with its scythes in an ‘X’-like fashion, or Kricketune crosses its scythes together and they glow light blue. It then tackles the opponent with its scythes, or Kricketune crosses its scythes and they glow light blue. It then slices the opponent in an ‘X’-like fashion. Scyther crosses its scythes and they start to glow light purple. It then flies towards the opponent and slices them in an ‘X’-like fashion. Zangoose’s claws glow light blue and the slashes an ‘X’ into the air, falling down and hitting the opponent with the ‘X’. Gliscor’s claws glow light blue, and it swipes them in an ‘X’ formation, creating a light blue ‘X’ in front of it and tackling the opponent with the ‘X’ in front of it, or Gliscor’s claws glow light blue and it swipes them in an ‘X’-like fashion, firing an ‘X’ shaped light blue energy at the opponent, or Gliscor’s claws glow light blue and it hits the opponent with them. Toxicroak crosses its arms across its chest and the large red claws on its arms glow light blue. Toxicroak then runs towards the opponent with its arms still crossed, then slashes it in an ‘X’-like pattern. Armaldo pulls its claws into its shell and when they come back out, the claws glow light blue. It then slashes the opponent in an ‘X’-like fashion. Dwebble jumps into the air and both of its claws glow light blue. It then crosses its claws in front of its body and falls towards the opponent. As it does, a purple or light blue ‘X’-like energy appears in front of Dwebble’s claws and it slams into the opponent. Crustle jumps into the air and both of its claws glow light blue. It then puts its claws together in front of it and a light blue ‘X’-like energy with a magenta outline appears in front of its claws and it falls forward, slamming into the opponent. The leaves on Leavanny’s arms glow light blue. Leavanny then crosses its arms, runs at the opponent, and tackles it with its arms. Pinsir’s claws glow light blue. It then puts its claws together in front of it and a light blue ‘X’-like energy with a magenta outline appears in front of its claws and it falls forward, slamming into the opponent; or, Pinsir’s pincers glow light green and grow longer. It slashes at the opponent with its pincers in an ‘X’ formation, leaving behind a trail of light green energy from each of its pincers. Hawlucha’s claws glow light blue. It then puts its claws together in front of it and a light blue ‘X’-like energy with a magenta outline appears in front of its claws and it falls forward, slamming into the opponent. Bisharp’s arms glow light blue. It then either crosses its arms in an ‘X’-like shape and then throws the energy surrounding its arms at the opponent, with a magenta outline as the energy gets thrown. Scizor’s claws glow light green. It then slashes at the opponent with its claws in an ‘X’ formation, leaving behind a trail of light green energy from each of its claws. Vikavolt’s pincers glow light green. It then slashes at the opponent with its pincers in an ‘X’ formation, leaving behind a trail of light green energy from each of its pincers. The user slashes at the target by crossing its scythe-like appendages or claws as if they were a pair of scissors. In the Pokémon Complete National Pokédex, this move was referred with its Japanese name as “Scissor-Cross”, instead of “X-Scissor”. 01 • 02 • 03 • 04 • 05 • 06 • 07 • 08 • 09 • 10 • 11 • 12 • 13 • 14 • 15 • 16 • 17 • 18 • 19 • 20 • 21 • 22 • 23 24 • 25 • 26 • 27 • 28 • 29 • 30 • 31 • 32 • 33 • 34 • 35 • 36 • 37 • 38 • 39 • 40 • 41 • 42 • 43 • 44 • 45 • 46 47 • 48 • 49 • 50 • 51 • 52 • 53 • 54 • 55 • 56 • 57 • 58 • 59 • 60 • 61 • 62 • 63 • 64 • 65 • 66 • 67 • 68 • 69 70 • 71 • 72 • 73 • 74 • 75 • 76 • 77 • 78 • 79 • 80 • 81 • 82 • 83 • 84 • 85 • 86 • 87 • 88 • 89 • 90 • 91 • 92 01 • 02 • 03 • 04 • 05 • 06 • 07 • 08 • 09 • 10 • 11 • 12 • 13 • 14 • 15 • 16 • 17 • 18 • 19 • 20 • 21 • 22 • 23 • 24 25 • 26 • 27 • 28 • 29 • 30 • 31 • 32 • 33 • 34 • 35 • 36 • 37 • 38 • 39 • 40 • 41 • 42 • 43 • 44 • 45 • 46 • 47 • 48 49 • 50 • 51 • 52 • 53 • 54 • 55 • 56 • 57 • 58 • 59 • 60 • 61 • 62 • 63 • 64 • 65 • 66 • 67 • 68 • 69 • 70 • 71 • 72 73 • 74 • 75 • 76 • 77 • 78 • 79 • 80 • 81 • 82 • 83 • 84 • 85 • 86 • 87 • 88 • 89 • 90 • 91 • 92 • 93 • 94 • 95 01 • 02 • 03 • 04 • 05 • 06 • 07 • 08 • 09 • 10 • 11 • 12 • 13 • 14 • 15 • 16 • 17 • 18 • 19 • 20 • 21 • 22 • 23 • 24 • 25 • 26 27 • 28 • 29 • 30 • 31 • 32 • 33 • 34 • 35 • 36 • 37 • 38 • 39 • 40 • 41 • 42 • 43 • 44 • 45 • 46 • 47 • 48 • 49 • 50 • 51 • 52 53 • 54 • 55 • 56 • 57 • 58 • 59 • 60 • 61 • 62 • 63 • 64 • 65 • 66 • 67 • 68 • 69 • 70 • 71 • 72 • 73 • 74 • 75 • 76 • 77 • 78 79 • 80 • 81 • 82 • 83 • 84 • 85 • 86 • 87 • 88 • 89 • 90 • 91 • 92 • 93 • 94 (XY • ORAS) • 95 • 96 • 97 • 98 • 99 • 100 01 • 02 • 03 • 04 • 05 • 06 • 07 • 08 • 09 • 10 • 11 • 12 • 13 • 14 • 15 • 16 • 17 • 18 • 19 • 20 • 21 • 22 • 23 • 24 • 25 26 • 27 • 28 • 29 • 30 • 31 • 32 • 33 • 34 • 35 • 36 • 37 • 38 • 39 • 40 • 41 • 42 • 43 • 44 • 45 • 46 • 47 • 48 • 49 • 50 51 • 52 • 53 • 54 • 55 • 56 • 57 • 58 • 59 • 60 • 61 • 62 • 63 • 64 • 65 • 66 • 67 • 68 • 69 • 70 • 71 • 72 • 73 • 74 • 75 76 • 77 • 78 • 79 • 80 • 81 • 82 • 83 • 84 • 85 • 86 • 87 • 88 • 89 • 90 • 91 • 92 • 93 • 94 • 95 • 96 • 97 • 98 • 99 • 100 00 • 01 • 02 • 03 • 04 • 05 • 06 • 07 • 08 • 09 • 10 • 11 • 12 • 13 • 14 • 15 • 16 • 17 • 18 • 19 • 20 • 21 • 22 • 23 • 24 25 • 26 • 27 • 28 • 29 • 30 • 31 • 32 • 33 • 34 • 35 • 36 • 37 • 38 • 39 • 40 • 41 • 42 • 43 • 44 • 45 • 46 • 47 • 48 • 49 50 • 51 • 52 • 53 • 54 • 55 • 56 • 57 • 58 • 59 • 60 • 61 • 62 • 63 • 64 • 65 • 66 • 67 • 68 • 69 • 70 • 71 • 72 • 73 • 74 75 • 76 • 77 • 78 • 79 • 80 • 81 • 82 • 83 • 84 • 85 • 86 • 87 • 88 • 89 • 90 • 91 • 92 • 93 • 94 • 95 • 96 • 97 • 98 • 99 75 • 76 • 77 • 78 • 79 • 80 • 81 • 82 • 83 • 84 • 85 • 86 • 87 • 88 • 89 • 90 • 91 • 92 • 93 • 94 • 95 • 96 • 97 • 98 • 99

Creative Scissor Skills Tips and Resources – The OT Toolbox

To increase fine motor strength, simply using the scissors more regularly may be enough, or see these other fun ideas to get strong little muscles! Scissor Skills Activities.
As an occupational therapist, working on scissor skills with kids is one of my favorite goal areas. There are so many ways to get creative with modifications to paper, lines, and scissors. The fine motor activities that work on the muscles and dexterity needed for scissor use are fun, too. One that I see many young children missing out on is scissors use. Being able to properly use scissors will be important in their school years, but what is most important is how the practice of using scissors can aid in the development of many skills: visual motor integration, bilateral coordination, and fine motor strength just to name a few. You need these skills to do everyday activities like buttoning, handwriting, and many sports and leisure activities. Scissors Crash Course– This article covers pre-requisite skills, and scissor skill progression from snips to cutting complex shapes. Also, be sure to check out this Cutting With Scissors Program designed to make progressive scissor use easy and fun for kids. Do they consistently orient their scissors correctly in their hand? Can they follow a thick line while cutting? Can they turn the paper with their opposite hand while they cut? Are they safe using scissors while seated? How choppy are their cuts – do they end up with really jagged paper or is it fairly smooth? Does the elbow of their cutting hand raise up into the air, and their shoulder shrug? Does their mouth open and close with the scissors, or is their tongue sticking out? Does their hand hurt after cutting for a short period of time? If you answered yes to the first four questions, and your kiddo can cut fairly smooth edges with ease, then they are most likely developing well with their scissors skills. If any of the above questions raised concerns, browse below for some therapeutic techniques to improve the development of scissors skills in your child. Set up for Success- For the development of any seated skill, make sure that the child is in a chair that they can sit upright in, with both feet on the floor. Having a strong base of support is so important for fine motor development. Holding the Scissors- Some kids don’t understand that the smaller hole is for their thumb, while the bigger hole is for their fingers. A fun way to remember the orientation of the scissors is to think of the scissors as a crocodile: the blades are the mouth, the thumb hole is their eye, and the finger hole is the jaw. Orientation of the Scissors While Cutting- An important piece of cutting with scissors that is easy to overlook is the way the scissors are oriented on the hand. Even once the fingers and thumb are in the right place, some kids cut with their thumb pointed down. To keep their thumb up, you can use simple cues like “thumbs up! ”Or, to keep with our crocodile theme, you can remind them that their thumb is the eye of the crocodile, and he has to see where he’s going! For kiddos that cannot stay on the line while cutting, practice is key. Use thicker, straight lines for more success, upgrading the task as they demonstrate skill. Eventually, your child will be cutting thin, complex shapes right before your eyes! Jagged edges after cutting are commonplace for new scissors users. However, if they are still looking pretty choppy after some time of practice, it may be time to think about teaching your child how to cut while keeping the scissors a little more “open”. Cue them to make less chopping sounds, to move slower if speed is the issue, and to glide like an ice skater. Or, keeping with the crocodile theme if that works for your kids, encourage them to keep the crocodile swimming along, being sneaky quiet under the water. These tips and tricks to help kids slow down when cutting with scissors can make a big difference on those choppy cutting skills. Many times, pediatric OTs run into issues with scissor skills and cutting accuracy that ties back to several similar areas: If you notice that your child gets fatigued very easily, raises their elbow or shoulder, or opens and closes their mouth while cutting, strengthening exercises may help. Quick Explanation: their hands get tired if they are not strong enough, and they may start incorporating the rest of the arm muscles (raising the elbow or shoulder) to compensate. Rather than using the intrinsic muscles (muscles within the hand) to manipulate the scissors, they are compensating for weakness by using larger and more proximal muscle groups…muscles that are bigger and stronger and closer to the core of the body, such as the shoulder girdle and biceps to move the scissors. When this occurs, they can compensate for weak hand muscles, but the accuracy of cutting skills lacks because larger muscle groups can not perform refined and precise scissor movements. Mouth movements when cutting with scissors can be described as overflow movements. The mouth or tongue movements come into play when they have not yet integrated the palmar reflex, which is also a sign that their fine motor skills could benefit from strengthening. To increase fine motor strength, simply using the scissors more regularly may be enough, or see these other fun ideas to get strong little muscles! Below are fun scissor skills activities that you can use to work on accuracy and precision in using scissors. Don’t forget the value in building hand strength and fine motor skills! I’m listing hand strengthening activities, too. Fine motor strengthening activities to develop and refine scissor use include: Activities using tongsIntrinsic hand strength with tongsBunny tongs activityBuild fine motor skills through playFine Motor precision & refinement with stickersArch development: spherical and cylindrical graspSeparation of the sides of the handMotoric separation of the sides of the handEye hand coordination activityHand strengthening activity with rubber bands Try these scissor activities to work on opening and closing of the scissors, cutting along lines, and cutting simple to complex shapes: Scissor Skills with Attention ChallengesCreative Scissor Skills Practice Scissor Skills Crash CourseImproving Scissor Skills with Play DoughCutting Foam BeadsUsing Stickers to Help with Scissor SkillsFinger-painting Fireworks for Scissor UseCutting with Scissors Program Looking for tips and tools from pediatric occupational therapists and physical therapists to help with all things scissor skills? The Scissor Skills Book is a comprehensive resource that covers all aspects of development related to cutting with scissors. If you’re a teacher who is tired of watching students snip their crafts and worksheets into tiny pieces… If you’re a therapist looking for creative ways to promote scissor skills in your treatment sessions… Written by a team of 10 pediatric physical and occupational therapists with years of experience in the field, The Scissor Skills Book is the ultimate resource for tips, strategies, suggestions, and information to support scissor use by kids. Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to [email protected] com.

Examples of interesting implementations of character stats? – Game Development Stack Exchange

I’ve come up with: (strength (unchanged), speed, stamina, and some others that are somewhat interesting wildcard … Better stat, better effects of the stat, but the stats don’t interact with each-other, there’s no Rock-Paper-Scissors…
I don’t think it’s relevant to what you’re doing, but the most interesting way I have seen so far is in Amnesia: The Dark Descent (by the makers of Penumbra). The basic principle of the game is that the character does not have any memory of what is going on, and you are alone in a castle that is alive – that is, something is chasing you, but you don’t know what. You have to try to escape, whilst avoiding the monsters that will chase you around and stopping yourself literally going insane. You cannot actually fight – one of the reasons its so scary (meeting a monster is certain death) – so there’s less attributes, but you have 2: Health and Sanity. Instead of having ‘100/100 health’, you simply get a description – ‘A few minor cuts and bruises’ or ‘Struggling to walk’. And then low sanity made the screen go all weird. Instead of a ‘hit points’, ‘constitution’, or ‘strength’ stat, you instead have ‘upper body muscle’ or ‘arm dexterity’. It’s very much a BODY PART + STAT system, but it makes more logical sense. I mean, if you worked out at a gym in a game running, then you would have much stronger legs, but having your hit points going up would be very generic – I have strong legs, so therefore getting hit in the chest doesn’t do as much damage. In the same kind of way, a high strength would usually equate to a direct damage bonus. With a sledgehammer, this makes sense, but there’s only a certain amount of power you can apply to a katana, say. It had your usual ‘base stats’ – strength, endurance, luck, perception, agility, intelligence etc. Then there were a number – I think about 23 – other stats. These stats actually defined your character more. For example, a high strength meant you could carry more equipment, but not necessarily meant you could do lots of damage with a baseball bat. In the same way having a high energy weapons meant you could do a lot of damage with a laser rifle, but wouldn’t necessarily mean you were very agile. Then each of the base skills had a trickledown of a few points to other skills – every point in strength gave about 1. 5 points to melee weapons, for example. This made me as a player consider my stat choices much more than ‘durrr shove it all in < weapon I'm using >‘.

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5 Ways to Sharpen Scissors – wikiHow

Over time and with consistent use, all scissors will eventually dull and loose the sharp edges they once possessed when you first … If you are having trouble cutting with dull scissors, you might consider going out and buying…
Over time and with consistent use, all scissors will eventually dull and loose the sharp edges they once possessed when you first bought them. If you are having trouble cutting with dull scissors, you might consider going out and buying another pair, since scissors are relatively inexpensive. However, there are several ways you can sharpen your scissors at home that only require a few common household items, and a little bit of practice. Obtain a piece of sandpaper. A sandpaper sheet with 150-200 grit will work just fine, but you could even go for a little bit of a finer grit (bigger grit number) if you want smoother edges to your scissor blades. Fold the sandpaper in half, with the rough sides facing outward. You will notice that the blades become sharper with every strip of sandpaper cut. Use full scissor strokes, beginning the cutting at the base of the scissors and extending to the tip. Cutting through sandpaper is good for scissors that aren’t horribly dull, but just need some touch up sharpening. 3Wipe down the scissors. Wipe down the blades of the scissors using a damp paper towel to clean off any sandpaper bits that may have collected on the blades while sharpening the scissors. Obtain a piece of aluminum foil. Take a piece of aluminum foil, about 8-10 inches long, and fold it lengthwise multiple times so you have a thick, folded strip of foil. The added layers of the aluminum foil will help sharpen the blades of the scissors multiple times with every cut of the foil. Cut the foil. Cut strips of the aluminum foil with your scissors until you have cut the entirety of the thick aluminum strip. Use full scissor strokes, cutting beginning at the base of the scissors and extending to the tip. Depending on the width of the strips you cut, you can sharpen your scissors blades a lot (by cutting many, skinny strips) or just a little bit (by cutting a few, thicker strips). 3Wipe down the scissors. Wipe down the blades using a paper towel dampened by warm water. This will get rid of any aluminum debris that may have clung to the blades as you were cutting. Obtain a sharpening stone. Sharpening stones can be found at most hardware stores, and can be used to sharpen any blade you have. Sharpening stones normally have two sides used for sharpening blades: a coarser, grainier side, and a fine side. [3] If you have very dull scissors, you should start out using the coarse side of the stone, and then use the finer side of the stone to finish your sharpening. Prepare the sharpening stone. Place a towel underneath your sharpening and lubricate it with either water or honing oil. Stores sell “honing oil” in the same area that they sell sharpening stones, but any oil, or even water for that matter, works just fine for lubricating the stone. Disassemble your scissors. Remove the screw attaching the scissor blades together. You do this so you can sharpen each blade separately, and have more mobility when sharpening the blades. More often than not, a flathead screwdriver small enough to fit in the screw’s head will work in unscrewing the scissors’ blades from each other. Sharpen the inner side of the blade. Place one blade of the scissors on the stone with the inner side of the blade (the flat, inside part of the blade that comes in contact with the material you’re cutting and the opposite inside part of the other blade), facing down. You want to create a nice, sharp angle between the inner blade (the part you’re currently sharpening), and the cutting edge (the top edge to the inner side of the blade). Where those two edges meet, is the area that needs to be sharp to cut things. Grip the handle of the scissor blade, and slowly pull the blade across the stone toward you, keeping the edge of the blade flat against the stone. [4] Repeat this action slowly and carefully until the blade has been sharpened. This should take about 10-20 pulls. Sharpen the cutting edge of the blade. Grip the handle of the scissor blade, and tilt the blade toward you until the cutting edge (the beveled edge that meets the inner side of the blade) lies flat on the stone. With the blade horizontal to you, slowly pull the blade across the stone toward you, keeping that beveled edge flat against the stone. Match the angle as closely as possible and continue to slide the blade forward. Repeat this action carefully until the blade is sharpened. If you started on the coarse side of the stone, finish with a few swipes on the finer side of the stone to give a nice, smooth finish. If you have never sharpened scissors this way before, you might find it difficult to judge when the edge of the blade is completely sharpened. Consider this trick: before you start sharpening the blades, run the tip of a permanent marker across the edge of the scissor blade. Start sharpening the blade, and when the marker line has been sanded away off the edge, you’ve successfully sharpened the blade. [5] Remove the burrs on the scissor blades. When you’re finished sharpening the scissors, there might be some rough burrs of metal along the sharpened edges of the blades. These burrs can easily be removed by putting the scissors backs together, and opening and closing them a few times. [6] Then use the scissors to cut through some kind of material like paper, cardboard, or fabric. This will further ensure the little burrs get knocked off the blades. If the scissors are sharp enough for your liking, you’re finished. If you want them to be sharper, repeat the sharpening process. 7Wipe down the scissors. Use a damp paper towel to wipe down the blades of the scissors and clean off any stone bits that may have collected on the blades while you sharpened the scissors. Fit the scissor blades around the mason jar. Open the pair of scissors as wide as they can go, and position the blades around the sides of the mason jar. The jar should be as far as it can go between the two blades. Hold the jar with one hand, and the scissors with the other hand. Cut the mason jar. Squeeze the scissors closed, and slide the mason jar out from between the blades as the scissors close. [7] This is the same way you would close the scissors if you were cutting paper or fabric. Use light pressure to close the scissors, let the glass do the sharpening work for you. Be sure to use a mason jar that you don’t mind damaging, because the blades of the scissors might leave scratch marks on the jar. 3Wipe down the scissors. Using a damp paper towel, wipe down the blades of the scissors to clear off any microscopic glass pieces that may have gathered on the blades while you were cutting the mason jar. 1Obtain a sewing pin. This method follows the same principle of using a mason jar to sharpen your scissors, while utilizing a smaller tool. Cut the pin. Squeeze the scissors closed, and slide the pin out from between the blades as the scissors close. This is the same way you would close the scissors if you were cutting paper or fabric. Use light pressure to close the scissors, let the metal pin do the sharpening work for you. Repeat this process until the blades have a smooth, clean edge. 3Wipe down the scissors. Using a damp paper towel, wipe down the blades of the scissors to clean off any metal bits that may have collected on the blades while cutting the pin. A Mason jar is simply a wide-mouthed jar used for canning foods. It gets its name from John L. Mason, who patented his version of the jar in the mid 1850s. The term may or may not be capitalized. It’s just shorthand and any type of wide-mouthed jar can be substituted for this jar if you don’t have access to the Mason variety. Yes, fabric scissors are meant to be kept very sharp to get a clean cut on the fabric you are working on. They can damage your scissors if you do them incorrectly. If you are concerned about this, you can purchase a special kit meant for sharpening scissors. You can also take them to a professional, who will safely sharpen your scissors for you. Generally speaking, yes. However, the mason jar method may not work because the scissors might not fit around the jar. The file would be a substitute for a whetstone, but would likely be too coarse a cut to work well. You can get fine-grit whetstones easily enough, and one will also be good for kitchen knives. They have a bow. This is why a professional needs to sharpen them. They will use a rocking motion while grinding the scissors on stone. You should always have a professional sharpen your haircutting shears, as they’re sharpened at a specific angle to be able to cut through hair. Yes, I have. But unless you have or make a jig to hold them,, or can maintain an exact angle by hand, be very careful, because grinders work very fast! Article SummaryXTo sharpen scissors, you can use a sheet of sandpaper. First, fold the sandpaper in half with the rough sides facing out. Then, hold the sandpaper in one hand and the scissors in the other. Open the scissors as wide as possible, and stick the sandpaper all the way into the base of the blades. Now, close the scissors to cut through the sandpaper. Make 10 to 20 cuts like this to fully sharpen the blades. Finally, wipe the scissor with a damp towel to remove any sandpaper residue. For a sharper finish, you can use a sharpening stone instead. First, use a screwdriver to remove the screw holding the scissor blades together. Then, place one of the blades flat on top of the sharpening stone with the angled, exterior side facing down. Drag the blade across the surface of the sharpening stone with the cutting edge of the blade in the back. Do this 10 to 20 times, then flip the blade over and drag it in the opposite direction. Do this 10 to 20 times. Finally, repeat the process with the other blade. When you’re finished, reassemble your scissors, and you’re done! If you want to learn how to use a sharpening stone or aluminum foil on your scissors, keep reading the article! “I am learning to sew. Have purchased at least 5 pairs of scissors, because I cut paper with them as well as fabric…. ” more

June 11, 2022

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